Archives for category: Grow Veggies

Cold, wet days drive Kaye inside. Good thing the garden is planted. But, you have to venture out once in a while to thin seedlings, deal with pests and encounter wildlife. Check out Season 2, Episode 2 of “Late Bloomer,” “Maintaining the Winter Garden.”

Please Like and Share and Comment! Thank you! – Kaye

As requested, I am posting my recipe for the green vegetable juice I have made almost every week since 2000. I just call it “green juice.” This is an alkaline drink which our bodies desperately need, because, I understand, an overly acidic body leads to disease. Meat, dairy and many other foods are acid, which is why it’s so important to alkalinize.

Green Vegetable Juice

Late Bloomer Green Juice

(I use percentages instead of measurements, because I have no idea if you might be making a glass to knock down immediately, or a gallon to put in the frig.)

Late Bloomer Green Juice

– Ingredients, All Organic* –

50% Celery (Rich in natural Sodium – Read about the powers of celery juice)

25% Zucchini (Loaded with Potassium)

20% Carrots (Loaded with Vit A and Beta-Carotene)

5% Parsley (High in essential Vitamin K)

1 Heaping TBL of Raw, Unheated Honey Per Quart (here’s a great honey)

You may also add other fresh leafy greens of your choice, such as spinach, kale and chard.

– Instructions –

Preferably with a twin gear juicer, which crushes rather than scrapes vegetables, juice the desired amount of juice. Put small amount of juice in blender and blend the total amount of honey into the juice. Add the sweetened juice back to the whole amount and stir well. Distribute evenly between jars or glasses. If you are storing juice to drink later, fill juice to the very top and seal with tight seal lids, keeping the very minimum amount of air in the jar. Must be used within 3-4 days. When juice loses it’s bright green color, it’s lost its primary health benefit (and doesn’t taste as good). Clean-up of the machine is a bit of a chore, so I like to make enough juice to last for 3-4 days. If you are out of honey, don’t let that stop you from juicing! It is drinkable, but, quite, shall we say, stout! You can substitute a ripe organic apple per quart!

*Organic produce is grown in mineral rich soil without pesticides. Here is EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce. If you are making the effort to juice, make it organic!

What are you juicing? Thanks for stopping by! And if you haven’t already, and are on Facebook, please Like https://www.facebook.com/LateBloomerShow and add to your special interests, so you don’t miss out on interesting articles and photos from gardens around the world! Happy Juicing! 🙂 – Kaye

Please watch and share Season 2, Episode 1 of “Late Bloomer,” “Planting the Winter Garden.” Featuring the original guitar composition of “Late Bloomer’s” new composer, guitar man Jon Pileggi. I’m very excited to add Jon to our lean and creative Late Bloomer team!

I’ve been busy planting a garden, making Late Bloomer episodes, creating an e-book “The Late Bloomer Show’s 10 Steps for a Great, First Garden,” redoing my website, and dealing with my sprained ankle and all the other stuff of life. Sorry I haven’t been blogging lately, but I will get back to it very soon! Are you able to grow food in the winter? Thanks for stopping by! – Kaye

P.S. Did you watch the Super Bowl? My American Airlines commercial ran during the game. I play a waitress. I’d love to know if you see it. Thanks!

Please watch and share my latest “Late Bloomer,” “Growing Corn Curbside,” the 20th episode and end of season 1! Also, the corn episode completes the corn, tomato and watermelon trilogy. Watch here, or higher resolution, including HD, on youtube.

Once again, I have to deal with my hard, clay soil, but, it was worth it. With corn this fresh, who needs to cook it?

What’s in store for Season 2? Well, more Monarchs, my winter garden, and lots, lots more! Thanks for your support! Comments welcome! – Kaye

I’m so glad I got the garden planted when I did in November. December was unseasonably cold for Southern California, and wet. I made an heroic effort on November 30th, remembering the six months without rain, to capture rainwater during the first downpour since April.

Gutter with Rain

Gutter with Rain

I ripped one gutter down pipe away from the house, and filled a 60 gallon L.A. city trash barrel, as well as all the plastic tubs from which I had just removed the Christmas decorations, and they all filled up within an hour. The problem was, it kept raining in December, so I didn’t need the water for three weeks! Christmas came and went and the decorations had to go back into the tubs, so I had to pour out half the saved water.

The weather, and the fact that there wasn’t much to do in the garden, kept me inside preparing for the holidays.

Off to the Rose Bowl

Stanford Sigma Chi and Friends

Since Stanford played the Rose Bowl, my son, Walker, invited his Sigma Chi brothers to stay at our house. They flew and drove in from all over. Our house is modest and there’s no guest room. Over four nights, we had 8, 12, 7 and 1 houseguest/s sleeping on various air mattresses and pallets on the floor. Here are most of the students off to the Rose Bowl, after a late New Year’s Eve celebration. You might have heard that Stanford won!

New Year’s Day night, while about 7 students were settling in, I dropped over to say “Happy New Year” to my neighbor, Zdena. She had just fallen on the dark steps at a friend’s house, and returned home and bandaged up her bloody, bruised leg. She was icing when I got there. I visited for a half hour and insisted she not see me out (she always does and turns the back step light on). Ironic, that, I went out in the dark and missed the bottom step, and fell and sprained my ankle! All that hoeing and digging and straining in the garden all year, and no injuries to speak of. I also lost the earpiece to my glasses, which I have searched for and not found. What an end to a celebratory holiday!

So, the ankle has kept me out of the garden except for short bits. It’s much better now, and I managed to get to an art opening in Culver City on Saturday (Donald Martiny at George Lawson Gallery, terrific!) after an all-afternoon inspiring, energizing and empowering meet-up with fellow Young Living distributors at a friend’s in Topanga Canyon. In addition to all that I am doing with acting and Late Bloomer and my garden, I am a distributor of the finest medicinal grade essential oils on the planet, Young Living. (more on that later)

So, it’s been busy and I have exciting plans for 2013! Checking on my garden today, here is what I found: 5 Monarch caterpillars on one nearly-bare branch, munching the last bits.

Monarch Caterpillars Feeding

Five Monarch Caterpillars on One Milkweed Branch

My milkweed is all but gone, and I’m moving caterpillars around to feed on the little bit left. I’m hedging that they all make maturity before the last bite is consumed. I counted about 14 today. I moved one chrysalis into the house on a particularly windy night, as well as two caterpillars, both of which died trying to form their chrysalises. I have eight viable chrysalises outside.

I harvested a bowl of lemons today. It seems they all ripened at the same time. No lemons for a year, and now I have 25!

Meyer Lemons

Bowl of Meyer Lemons

I pulled out a handful of small carrots from the two barrels. I need about 10 barrels to keep this family in carrots!

Home-grown Carrots

Baby Finger Organic Carrots

I have one small row of radishes and they are all pretty much ready to be picked. I need to plant more!

Organic Radishes

Home-grown Organic Radishes

As I was photographing the carrots, the resident flock of wild parrots flew over my head and landed in my neighbor, Gini’s, tall evergreen tree (can anyone help me identify this tree?). There were between 50 and 70 bright green parrots with black beaks. They are the Nanday Conure Parrots, and they are very sociable and like to hang with their group.

Nanday Conure Parrots

Nanday Conure Parrot Flock in Evergreen Tree

Now, I’m off to the Palisades Garden Club meeting. They are having a wildlife biologist come and speak, who takes much better insect photos than I do! Thanks for reading! Hope your new year is off to a great start!  – Kaye

I’m from the South, and there’s nothing I love more than corn, tomatoes and watermelon. I knew if I had a garden I had to grow all three. You’ve seen my tomato episode. Please watch and share “Kaye’s Watermelon Story” – Episode 19. Since I only had a 6’x6′ space, I had to grow baby watermelons.

If I had it to do over again, knowing what I know now, I would grow them in raised beds with trellises to save space. Hope you enjoy my little tale! – Kaye

As the sprouts surge from recent rain, the number of species left to sprout is winding down. A few more seeds have sprouted, with a few more to go. Check out the last post, if you missed it, to see what’s sprouting in my Late Bloomer garden. I sprinkled dill seeds on the parkway to fill in where my sunflowers were. It is sprouting up all over!

kk_lb-garden1219-17

Dill Bouquet Sprout

This buckwheat has self-seeded in my flower island.

kk_lb-garden1219-16

Common Buckwheat Cover Crop Sprout

These poppy sprouts are tiny and incredibly delicate at this stage.

kk_lb-garden1219-14

Hungarian Blue Bread Seed Poppy Sprout, Rare

Sort of looks like red tongues already! That’s a nasturtium top left. It has reseeded all over the former watermelon patch.

kk_lb-garden1219-12

Red Deer Tongue Lettuce

A packet of wildflower seeds of 14 varieties of annual and perennial species came as a gift for ordering seeds, so I sprinkled it between the milkweed and sidewalk to fill in. It will bloom in the spring.

kk_lb-garden1219-9

Wildflower, Alternative Lawn Blend

A fellow blogger in Ireland kept mentioning borage, so I thought I must try it. I planted it in the flower island. We shall see if it attempts to take over!

Borage Sprout

Borage Medicinal Sprout

Thanks for stopping by! What’s growing in your garden? Or, what are you planning for next year? – Kaye

In Southern California, growing food is a year-round activity, passion, and, for some, profession. There are no long, winter months to perfectly plan for the following year, we just do the best we can with what we have and keep going. This is a follow-up to Fall Sprouts – Part 1.

Here are eight more sprouts from my fall garden. It’s amazing that so many of the sprouts look so similar after just opening the first set of heart-shaped leaves. Only the next set of leaves begins to identify the plant. With the exception of the celery seedlings I planted on Labor Day, my entire fall garden was direct-seeded in November.

Various Baby Lettuce Sprouts

Mesclun Salad Mix

kk_lb-fall-sprouts2-13

Cascadia Snap Peas Hybrid

kk_lb-fall-sprouts2-16

Mei Quing Choi Baby

kk_lb-fall-sprouts2-17

Five Color Silverbeet Swiss Chard

kk_lb-fall-sprouts2-28

Redbor Kale

kk_lb-fall-sprouts2-30

Wild Farm Garlic

kk_lb-fall-sprouts2-32

Veronica F1 (Romanesco) Cauliflower Hybrid

kk_lb-fall-sprouts2-37

Cherry Belle Radish Heirloom

As you can see, I have some bug and slug damage on a number of the sprouts. I’m going to have to be very vigilant (didn’t I say this in Episode 8 of “Late Bloomer?”) to nurture these plants to maturity. Seeds are from Botanical Interests, West Coast Seeds, and Seeds of Change. I planted 18 cloves of garlic  from a head given to me by Lisa at Wild Farm in Woodside, California, Episode 15. I intermixed them with the leftover Mexican Sunflowers along the street, and it took about six weeks for them to emerge. Nothing was happening till we got three solid days of rain over a week ago, then they started shooting up. I haven’t watered the garden since it rained, as the ground is still wet. Just think how much Colorado River water (that we we exist on) would have been saved if all the homeowners turned off their automatic sprinklers for a week. Grow food, not lawns!

If you haven’t visited Late Bloomer Facebook page, please do, and subscribe by following the simple directions in the top post. There are lots of great links to inspire, educate and encourage, so please Like. And post your own garden photos! Let’s get the conversation going. You can see a clip of my small, front garden here. Thanks for stopping by! What are you growing? – Kaye

There’s nothing I get a bigger kick out of than watching a sprout push out of the earth from a seed I have planted. These seedlings come from seeds I planted within a week of one another. In Southern California, gardeners do not get a break! We can, and must, if you are obsessed as I am now, plant year-round.

kk_lb-sprouts-17

Snow Pea – Oregon Sugar Pod II

kk_lb-sprouts-23

Moss Curled Parsley Heirloom

kk_lb-sprouts-3

Gourmet Blend Beet Heirloom

kk_lb-sprouts-4

Broccoli Raab Rapini Heirloom

kk_lb-sprouts-5

Baby Finger Carrot Heirloom

kk_lb-sprouts-6

Copenhagen Market Green Cabbage Heirloom

kk_lb-sprouts-7

Italian Dark Leaf Parsley Heirloom

Stay tuned for Part 2! Are seeds are from Botanical Interests. The snow peas are a hybrid, bred for resisting mildew, which I have a huge problem with here by the coast. Thanks for stopping by. Please check back on my progress! – Kaye

We received a little rain last night, enough to completely cover the surface of the garden. Before the sun comes out (it always does) and dries it all off, I captured this wide shot.

kk_lb-wet-garden-11

Kaye’s Wet Garden, Wide View

As you can see, I’m way behind on fall planting. Thankfully, we are in Southern California, so, there’s a good chance I can still get 100 day cauliflower before it gets hot next spring. Those are six celery plants bottom right, with two Stupice Heirloom Tomato plants behind the celery. They are producing small, but perfect tomatoes, at least for now. It’s pretty cold for here.

kk_lb-wet-garden-12

Reworked Watermelon Patch

This is what I have worked on a few hours the last two days. I reset the log border after pulling out the tomato vines, as I learned the orange tree suffers from anything tall surrounding it. It’s exploding with blooms. From now on, it will be lettuces and herbs only at the base. I dug up the watermelon bed, pulled and trimmed all but two vines with three 5″ melons growing, and began to lay it out for cabbage, peas and cauliflower. I will put some wildflowers right by the sidewalk.

kk_lb-wet-garden-14

Sweet Pea Trellis

It took a couple of hours last night to dig down about 8″ through the rock hard clay soil, bypassing existing sprinkler irrigation pipes, to sink in these metal stakes for climbing peas. I had to do it with a hand trowel, so my hand and wrist took a beating. With an 8″ hole, all I had to do was pound them in with my sledge hammer another 4 to 5 inches, then pack in more soil in the hole, and tie up the nylon mesh. I am trying to utilize the space the best I can. The tall peas will only shadow the driveway as the sun goes over. It was after dark when I stopped, just short of putting in the first row of Super Sugar Snap pea seeds. Oh, I wish I had kept going by lamplight, because the rain would have given them a great start, but my hand was tired of trying to shove a trowel through the rocky clay soil.

Lemons are finally ripening, and look almost ready to pick with the leftover raindrops.

kk_lb-wet-garden-15

Raindrops on Meyer Lemons

My spinach leaves are coming along. I could pinch these off for a salad tonight, if I had anything to go with it! Well, I do have pineapple guavas! But, I’d like to wait to see if they will get a little bigger. So far, the bugs have not eaten too much.

kk_lb-wet-garden-19

Raindrops on Young Spinach Leaves

I am immensely honored to have been nominated for a blog award, which I will tell you about in the next post. I have been working hard setting up a completely new “Late Bloomer” site, which will be much more user friendly. I will unveil it before Thanksgiving! Thanks for stopping by! – Kaye

The Clutter Chronicles

Documenting my collections for posterity

Jillian Kittrell

Confessions from a Mom in Haiti

Hunter Kittrell Photography

Sharing Haiti Through Photos

The Barefoot Farmer

Kaye Kittrell's Garden Web Series and Blog

Auntie Dogma's Garden Spot

kick your shoes off and come on in ...

ArtsandAg

Exploring the back roads of Hickman County Tennessee

Re-Grow Roots

Learning to live harmoniously in Missouri.

GALLIVANCE

Travel Tales With A Twist

TED Blog

The TED Blog shares interesting news about TED, TED Talks video, the TED Prize and more.

Homeless Mountain

An economically challenged voice from the hills

The Palladian Traveler

Meandering along the cobblestone and travertine to somewhere...

The Bio Infos

All about living beings

Garden Walk Garden Talk

The Greater Garden of Nature

brissiemaz

Brissiemaz at home and away

The Inner Gardener

Inner City Gardening for the Soul

Tuesdays with Laurie

"Whatever you are not changing, you are choosing." —Laurie Buchanan

enlightenedlotuswellness.wordpress.com/

Awareness. Education. Motivation.

ONvegetables

Information for commercial vegetable production in Ontario