It’s been five days since my last post, and eight days since the onset of a doozy of a chest cold. I’ve spent no more than an hour in the garden any day for the last week, not enough! Three days ago, my zucchini plant looked great with several fresh new leaves, blooms and zucchinis growing. However, when I looked out on Friday, it was wilted. Since it has not been that hot, I was worried. I posted this photo on my Facebook page on Friday.

Witted Zucchini

Witted Zucchini on Friday

The other vine, coming from the same plant, looked fine.

Zucchini Wilt on One Vine

Zucchini Wilt on One Vine

I had recently been treating the powdery mildew with 10% milk in water solution, and it seemed to be doing well. But, I also added some compost around the base and changed the watering a bit. There is such a thing as water wilt, but, it should have perked back up by the next day. Today, it looked worse.

Zucchini Bacterial Wilt

Zucchini Bacterial Wilt

Though I never saw one in my garden, striped and spotted cucumber beetles are carriers of a bacterium (Erwinia tracheiphila) – it overwinters in their gut – and this bacterium will turn the vines to mush. It cannot be controlled with pesticides (which I wouldn’t use anyway). First the leaves wilt, then the developing squash turn to mush. When I lifted the vine to see what condition it was in, it easily came away in my hand. The whole middle was mush. I read that, first, one vine gets hit and then it spreads. The only thing to do is get rid of the whole plant. Which I did.

Zucchini Vine with Bacterial Wilt

Zucchini Vine with Bacterial Wilt

It was a shame, because I had a lot of fresh leaves and blooms opening. I love this sight!

Young Zucchini Leaves

Young Zucchini Leaves

I cut off all the developing zucchinis and juiced them. This was the last of my illustrious zucchini made famous in “Zucchini Madness,” the 17th episode of “Late Bloomer!

The Last Zucchini Harvest

The Last Zucchini Harvest

I’m sad to see my zucchini go, and truthfully, I don’t know if I will try zucchini again next year, because it requires a lot of space, and is so susceptible to powdery mildew where we live. But, February is a long way off, so I shall see how I feel then. Thanks for stopping by!

Please visit my Facebook page for tons of interesting articles related to gardening, farming, raw foods, all over the world. I am encouraging a world-wide audience for “Late Bloomer.” (Unfortunately, I can only speak and write English!) – Kaye